Our Blog

Bernie and Common Good Capitalism Movement

June 23, 2016

Terry Mollner posted the following on his Huffington Post blog site. It argues that Senator Bernie Sanders has a golden opportunity to not only create a political movement but also a fundamental movement, a movement at the level of importance of the Civil Rights’, Women’s, and Environment Movements. This is where what is currently an acceptable social tradition is accurately identified as immoral: not fair. Therefore it is not a choice to do it or not do it. We must stop doing it because we have matured to where we can see it is immoral. 

He argues that the fundamental movement Bernie has the ability to launch is that giving priority to self-interest in business is immoral. As members of a society we have agreed to give priority to the common good. Companies that are not doing this have left the society and are now in competition with it. Therefore this must stop. 

MoveOn distributed this article to its entire staff and Terry is working to get this fundamental movement seriously considered by the Sanders Campaign staff: 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/terry-mollner/bernie-and-common-good-ca_b_10395316.html

Corporations Are Ready for Common Good Capitalism

June 23, 2016

The show Marketplace on National Public Radio did a segment that is one of the best short descriptions of the changes that have taken place in corporate behavior over recent years with excellent statistics backing it up. It clearly reveals the need for and our readiness for the emergence of common good capitalism. The below is from its website which provides video, audio, and printed copy:

http://features.marketplace.org/priceofprofits/

Common Good Capitalism

February 12, 2016

In this program, Hazel Henderson discusses transition management strategies and the likely next stage of capitalism with Terry Mollner, author of Common Good Capitalism: It’s Next! and board member of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream, now owned by global food giant Unilever.  Terry describes the saga of this negotiation with Ben and Jerry’s shareholders, their effort to remain independent and how their social mission was recognized and began to change Unilever.  Terry points to the current wave of mega-mergers in our global economy, where brands in food, air travel, communications and many other sectors end up cooperating as duopolies.  In this world beyond competition companies can reach a new level: changing their goals and business models so as to place top priority on cooperatively serving the common good with competitive profit-seeking taking second place.  How to square this with anti-trust conventions will be key.  These startling views will be hotly debated as human populations and economies learn transition management strategies as tools to develop further on our small finite planet.

Competition, Creativity and Cooperation

February 12, 2016

In this program, Hazel Henderson with Terry Mollner, author of Common Good Capitalism: It’s Next! examine his hopeful view of transition management. Mollner explains how capitalism can evolve from today’s global completion for resources and markets and the toll this takes on our societies and planetary ecosystems.  Competition and human creativity have brought us to this stage.  Both agree on today’s wider perception, scientific discoveries, new communications tools, satellites observing our effects on the Earth which make it evident that cooperation must now be the framework for all our actions.  This is in line with Charles Darwin’s view that humanity’s success in evolving for millennia is based on our genius for cooperating.  Nature’s transition management is driven by adaptation to environmental stresses.  Darwin’s conviction saw our further development would lead to more altruism as we recognize our inter-dependence on each other and all lifeforms on our planetary home.

Rethinking Capitalism

September 23, 2015

Check out this TED Talk by Paul Tudor Jones on how to rethink capitalism. Here is another way to consider the emergence of Common Good Capitalism. As part of the CGCM Community, we think you’ll like it. Enjoy!

www.ted.com/talks/paul_tudor_jones_ii_why_we_need_to_rethink_capitalism

About the Common Good Capitalism Movement

March 31, 2015

The mission of the Common Good Capitalism Movement is to mature capitalism into common good capitalism.

Common Good Capitalism is when in a free market economy individuals and organizations freely choose to give priority to the common good and second priority to profit or mission. They can act alone. Or they can join in an association with competitors to reach agreements to voluntarily raise the level labor, environmental, and social playing field beyond what governments have demanded of them while continuing to compete as a secondary priority. Relative to one another this cooperation for the common good will not increase costs. This is not collusion for self-interest; it is cooperation for the common good and, therefore, legal.

We are confident the answer to the above question will be what the wise throughout history have discovered: we freely choose to give priority to the common good. It has usually been labeled “moral behavior.” This cannot be legislated or policed because it can only be the result of unique free choices in each particular situation. Therefore, this is an invitation to you to freely choose to join this movement.

If the priority of your for-profit or non-profit organization is the common good - whatever you determine it to be, register it here.

This will allow it to receive the recognition it deserves. It will also allow others who seek to do business with such organizations to come to this website and discover you have made this declaration. As this movement grows, each day more will come to this site to see if your organization is registered here. You can join this movement both as an individual (free) and organization (an annual currency amount you choose). Probably you and your organization are already a part of it but not being recognized for it. Now you can be recognized for it and also actively participate in this voluntary maturation of capitalism.